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What is CoderDojoDojo Sushi?

CoderDojo Sushi is delivered on double-sided laminated cards known as Sushi Cards. One card = one concept. Dojo Sushi is a method of communicating programming concepts which is suited to the CoderDojo environment. Concepts are communicated in easy-to-digest, bite-sited chunks (hence Sushi).

CoderDojo Sushi

Topic Full Title Presented by Dojo Level Language Description Type Category
HTML, CSS My First Website CoderDojo Foundation CoderDojo Bray/CDF Beginner English Originally created by CoderDojo Bray. Current cards have been updated and redesigned with creators approval by the CoderDojo Foundation. Sushi Series
HTML, CSS Beginner HTML, CSS Liberty Global N/A Beginner Dutch Translated by Liberty Global. These cards will introduce you to HTML and CSS! Sushi Series
HTML, CSS HTML, CSS livello base Coderdojo Milano Milan (Italy) Beginner Italian Originally created by CoderDojo Bray. Translated by Coderdojo Milano. Sushi Series
HTML, CSS Intermediate HTML CSS Sushi CoderDojo Foundation CoderDojo Foundation Intermediate English Created by the CoderDojo Foundation. These cards will further your know of HTML and CSS! Sushi Series
HTML, CSS Intermediate HTML, CSS Liberty Global N/A Intermediate Dutch Translated by Liberty Global. These cards will develop your knowledge of HTML and CSS! Sushi Series
HTML, CSS HTML, CSS livello intermedio Coderdojo Milano Milan (Italy) Intermediate Italian Originally created by CoderDojo Bray. Translated by Coderdojo Milano. Sushi Series
HTML, CSS HTML, CSS livello avanzato Coderdojo Milano Milan (Italy) Advanced Italian Originally created by CoderDojo. Translated by Coderdojo Milano. Sushi Series
HTML, CSS Mijn eerste website CoderDojo Belgium Belgium Beginner Nederlands Originally created by CoderDojo Bray see English version Sushi Series
HTML, CSS Mon premier site CoderDojo Belgium Belgium Beginner Français Originally created by CoderDojo Bray see English version Sushi Series
HTML, CSS Primul meu Website CoderDojo Oradea Romania Beginner Romana Originally created by CoderDojo Oradea/Romania Sushi Series
JavaScript JavaScript Incepatori CoderDojo Oradea Romania Beginner Romana Originally created by CoderDojo Oradea/Romania Sushi Series
JavaScript Beginner Javascript Sushi CoderDojo Foundation CoderDojo Foundation Beginner English Created by the CoderDojo Foundation. These cards will introduce you to beginner concepts for Javascript! Sushi Series
JavaScript Beginner JavaScript Liberty Global N/A Beginner Dutch Translated by Liberty Global. These cards will introduce you to JavaScript! Sushi Series
JavaScript JavaScript livello base Coderdojo Milano Milan (Italy) Beginner Italian Originally created by CoderDojo Bray. Translated by Coderdojo Milano. Sushi Series
JavaScript Intermediate Javascript Sushi CoderDojo Foundation CoderDojo Foundation Intermediate English Created by the CoderDojo Foundation. These cards will further your knowledge of Javascript! Sushi Series
JavaScript Intermediate JavaScript Liberty Global N/A Intermediate Dutch Translated by Liberty Global. These cards will develop your knowledge of JavaScript! Sushi Series
JavaScript JavaScript livello intermedio Coderdojo Milano Milan (Italy) Intermediate Italian Originally created by CoderDojo Bray. Translated by Coderdojo Milano. Sushi Series
Databases Beginner Databases CoderDojo Foundation CoderDojo Foundation Beginner English Created by the CoderDojo Foundation. These cards will introduce you to databases! Sushi Series
Databases Beginner Databases Liberty Global N/A Beginner Dutch Translated by Liberty Global. These cards will introduce you to databases! Sushi Series
Raspberry Pi Beginner Raspberry Pi CoderDojo Foundation CoderDojo Foundation Beginner English Created by the CoderDojo Foundation. These cards will introduce you to Raspberry Pi! Sushi Series
Scratch Beginner Scratch CoderDojo Bray CoderDojo Bray Beginner English Created by CoderDojo Bray. These cards will introduce you to Scratchi! Sushi Series
PYTHON Python-Beginner CoderDojo Oradea Romania Beginner Romana Originally created by CoderDojo Oradea/Romania Sushi Series


  • If you are interested in creating some CoderDojo Sushi cards please get in touch at info@coderdojo.com.

CoderDojo Community Created Sushi

Topic Full Title Presented by Dojo Level Language Description Type Category
Raspberry Pi RPi Sushi Cards Richard Hayler CoderDojo Ham Beginner English How to use Raspberry Pi Sushi cards! Sushi Series
E-Card Valentines Day Sushi Project David Welch CoderDojo-IowaCity Beginner English Valentine's Day Sushi Card Project Sushi Series
Scratch Scratch Wasabi - Dojo Sushi Edition @ginglexia, two youth mentors Wilmslow CoderDojo Beginner English See the Kata Scratch Sushi page for our individual PDFs. Sushi Series
Scratch Scratch Wasabi - EU Code Week Edition @ginglexia, two youth mentors Wilmslow CoderDojo Beginner English See the Kata EU Scratch Sushi page for our individual PDFs. Sushi Series
Scratch Scratch Sushi Handouts Rob Curran Wilmslow CoderDojo Beginner English See the Kata Wilmslow CoderDojo page for our individual PDFs. Sushi Series
Robotics/ Edison Edison Sushi Mark Corkery Banbridge CoderDojo Beginners English The Sushi Card are designed to be used with the Edison robot within a CoderDojo session. Sushi Series

Dojo Sushi in action

A Sushi Card in use in CoderDojo Bray

Dojo Sushi has evolved in the Bray CoderDojo HTML stream as a way of coping with the need to communicate ideas to a constantly changing group of learners – with wildly varying starting knowledge, maturity and concentration spans. And in a noisy environment where its difficult to hold the attention of the group as a whole for more than two minutes. We needed something that allowed learners who are new to the subject to get comfortable at their own pace, whilst the more experienced learners can race ahead.

A Sushi Card

How can I make my own Sushi Cards?

If you would like to make your very own CoderDojo Sushi cards for your Dojo you can. You can put your Dojo's name and logo on the cards and share them back with the global community by adding them to Kata or emailing them to the CoderDojo Foundation team at info@coderdojo.com.

The source files for the Sushi Cards are available in SVG format. Use them as templates for your own cards.

Our Sushi Cards are made in Inkscape and the source files are in the .SVG Inkscape format. But you can make them in whatever tool you like. We use the Inkscape format so that anyone can download and modify the cards without the need to purchase proprietary software. We use InkScape because we think it’s great and it’s also free!

Find Inkscape templates here

If you would prefer to work with a Microsoft Word format you can see a sample Word template for Sushi (created by CoderDojo Dun Laoighre) below.

See Word template here

If you want to use the same fonts as the ones on the card you'll need to install the League Gothic font. You can get this font from http://www.fontsquirrel.com/fonts/league-gothic. The other font used is Arial Narrow which is included in both Inkscape and Word.

There are five different coloured cards we use to distinguish series with different subjects, we have used so far pale sky blue for HTML/CSS, yellow for JavaScript and red for Databases. If you are translating the current cards please use the same colour. If you are making a new series you are free to choose one of the other colours. You can see the colour codes below:

Colour Code Current use
Red (Fiery) #ed462f Databases
Sky Blue (Sky) #2c9cfb HTML/CSS
Yellow (Sun) #fbcc33 Javascript
Green (Grass) #61c93f none (free)
Dark blue (Sea) #2e7ac7 none (free)

How can I share my Sushi Cards?

We'd love it if you share any cards you make!

Please email us for more information at info@coderdojo.com or check out HERE to see information on adding content to Kata.

Please share your cards in the Community Sushi section either by uploading PDF files to Kata or linking to an external page or repository where they are stored.

Making Sushi Cards – tips!

1. One card, one concept

A card should teach one important concept. What is an important concept? That's the tricky bit – and that's for the card designer to decide. There is no scientific way of defining this!

Ideally a Sushi Card should show example code that illustrates the principle as simply and clearly as possible. Don't be tempted to add in 'side' lessons which show something else. Instead, make these into separate cards.

2. Laminate the cards

The medium is the message – the fact that Sushi cards are two-sided laminated cards is important because they don't look intimidating; learners can move at their own pace and there is never the suggestion that a massive HTML Made Terrifying 300-page tome needs to be digested before the newbie can do exciting things.

Also … laminated cards work because they don’t eat up screen estate when learners are working on small laptops. For instance, if they’re learning HTML, they’ll probably have three or four windows open – so having another open to show the class notes is contributing to serious window management problems.

Finally – lamination will save you time and money. Our laminator cost around €30. The individual laminating pouches are less than 10 cents each. Once you’ve produced your laminated sheet it will last for many weeks of Dojo sessions, in contrast to paper handouts which are usually discarded after one or two Dojos.

3. Practice-led, not theory-led

The approach is practice-led rather than theory-led so that learners see results as fast as possible. We think this mirrors the way most programmers learn anyway. (First take some existing code and hack it, read up the theory only if you can’t figure out what’s going on …)

4. Keep examples short and sweet

Any example code should be as short as possible (to minimise mistyping) and should be as easy to understand as possible – make examples as concrete as you can. Using self-descriptive variable and parameter names is helpful (good programming anyway).

5. Don’t feel you have to explain everything

Don't feel you have to explain everything – it's often better to show some self-descriptive code and then ask the learner the question 'can you figure out what this is doing?' or 'how would you change this to do X'. You’re pointing learners in the right direction, but you're not watching over them for the whole journey.

Also … improvision should be encouraged. Learning examples should be presented in such a way that the learner can riff on the examples and quickly produce new materials which showcase their own interests.

6. Cards should be self-contained

Although the lessons should be built on one another, individual cards should still be fairly self-contained. In the HTML example it's necessary to do the first two or three cards in order, but after the learner has created a basic site cards could be picked up in any order. (Although to make this work, you may need to revisit earlier cards after you add in a later card).

7. Pictures are good

Having the materials look inviting is important. We try to show an end-result that looks exciting and makes learners want to dive in. In the example shown above we use a crossword to demonstrate table layout techniques (rowspan and CSS formatting) mainly because the crossword and suduko puzzles look interesting.

Illustrations also provide valuable feedback that a learner is 'doing the right thing' – in particular illustrations which tie the coding inputs to the expected outputs. They form a reference point which allows learners to verify that what they’re doing is OK.

8. The cards will never be perfect – don’t worry!

Whenever you work with learners and use the cards you’ll quickly come across all sorts of errors, imperfections and barriers to comprehension. But don’t worry about it. It’s normal. Just go home and modify them. Each change you make will make the cards easier to use.